A pilot study of a mind-body stress management program for student veterans

Author: Louisa G Sylvia1, Eric Bui2, Rana Chudnofsky3, Laura Lakin3, Megan D McCarthy4, Carina T Gupta3, Kayla Furbish3, Darshan H Mehta5, John W Denninger5, Elyse R Park2, Gregory L Fricchione1, Thomas J Spencer1
Author Information:
1 Home Base, A Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, USA; Harvard Medical School, USA.
2 Harvard Medical School, USA; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA.
3 Home Base, A Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, USA.
4 Home Base, A Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, USA. Electronic address: mmccarthy60@mgh.harvard.edu.
5 Home Base, A Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program, USA; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA.
Conference/Journal: Complement Ther Clin Pract
Date published: 2020 Aug 1
Other: Volume ID: 40 , Pages: 101221 , Special Notes: doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2020.101221. , Word Count: 152


Background:
Student veterans are an at-risk population given the challenges of military experience, reintegration to civilian life, and attending college. Therefore, there is a need for innovative programs to support student veterans. The present study sought to determine the acceptability and effectiveness of a 10-week mind-body stress reduction intervention for student veterans, or Resilient Student Warrior.

Materials and methods:
Eighty-six student veterans took part in the 10-week mind-body stress reduction course, Resilient Student Warrior.

Results:
Results showed a significant improvement in reports of stress reactivity, mindfulness, sleep disturbance and coping skills for stress (p < 0.05), but not self-efficacy, perceived stress, depressive or post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The intervention was reported as helpful by 96% of participants, with 95% of participants stating they would recommend the course to others.

Conclusion:
Future studies should further assess the effectiveness of mind-body interventions among the student veteran population.

Keywords: Military; Mindfulness; Stress; Student; Veteran.

PMID: 32891295 DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2020.101221

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