A primary care based randomized controlled trial of 12 weeks whole body vibration for balance improvement in Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Author: Pozo-Cruz JD, Alfonso-Rosa RM, Ugia JL, McVeigh JG, Del Pozo-Cruz B, Sañudo B.
Affiliation: Department of Physical Education and Sport. University of Seville. Spain.
Conference/Journal: Arch Phys Med Rehabil.
Date published: 2013 Jun 27
Other: Pages: S0003-9993(13)00467-X , Special Notes: doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.05.030 , Word Count: 242



OBJECTIVE:
To determine if a 12-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program improved balance in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
DESIGN:
Randomized controlled trial.
SETTING:
Primary healthcare setting.
PARTICIPANTS:
Fifty participants with T2DM.
INTERVENTIONS:
Participants were randomly allocated to either a WBV group (WBV; n = 25) which performed a 12-week WBV-based exercise program on an oscillating platform (12-16 Hz - 4 mm; 3 sessions per week) or a usual-care control group (CON; n = 25).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Clinical and socio-demographic variables were recorded at baseline. Static and dynamic balance were also assessed at baseline by measuring postural sway (measurement of center of pressure (COP) excursions in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions) using a Wii Balance Board and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG).
RESULTS:
Significant between group differences in COP excursions with eyes closed were found with feet apart and feet together. In addition, participants in the WBV group exhibited significantly lower COP excursions with eyes closed after the intervention, while participants in the control group experienced a non-significant deterioration in COP excursions (i.e. greater excursion) with eyes open (medio-lateral axis). There was no significant difference in the TUG test post intervention.
CONCLUSION:
WBV provides a safe and well tolerated approach to improve balance in T2DM participants. These findings may have important implications for falls prevention in those with T2DM in the primary healthcare setting.
Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
PMID: 23811317

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