Effects of Tai Chi on Cerebral Haemodynamics and Health-related Outcomes in Older Community Adults at Risk of Ischaemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author: Zheng G1, Zheng X2, Li J2, Duan T3, Ling K3, Tao J4, Chen L5
Author Information:
11 College of Nursing and Health Management, Shanghai University of Medicine & Health Sciences, Shanghai, China.
22 College of Rehabilitation Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
33 Department of Physical Education, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
44 Laboratory of Rehabilitation Technology, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
55 Collaborative Innovation Center for Rehabilitation Technology, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China.
Conference/Journal: J Aging Phys Act.
Date published: 2019 Feb 12
Other: Volume ID: 1-27 , Special Notes: doi: 10.1123/japa.2018-0232. [Epub ahead of print] , Word Count: 160


This study investigated the effects of Tai Chi compared to no exercise control on the cerebral haemodynamic parameters and other health-related factors in community older adults at risk of ischemic stroke. 170 eligible participants were randomly allocated to Tai Chi or control group. The cerebral haemodynamic parameters and physical fitness risk factors of cardiovascular disease were measured at baseline, 12 weeks and 24 weeks. After 12-weeks intervention, Tai Chi significantly improved the minimum of blood flow velocity (BFVmin), BFVmean, pulsatility index and resistance index of the right anterior cerebral artery, and BFVmax, BFVmin and BFVmean parameters of the right middle cerebral artery. Tai Chi training also decreased triglyceride, fasting blood glucose and homocysteine levels, and improved balance ability. Therefore, the supervised 12-week Tai Chi exercise had potential beneficial effects on cerebral haemodynamics, plasma risk factors and balance ability in older community adults at risk of ischaemic stroke.

KEYWORDS: Tai Chi; cerebral haemodynamics; randomized controlled trial; risk of ischaemic stroke

PMID: 30747548 DOI: 10.1123/japa.2018-0232

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