Mindfulness is associated with psychological health and moderates the impact of fibromyalgia.

Author: Pleman B1, Park M1, Han X1, Price LL2,3, Bannuru RR1,4, Harvey WF1, Driban JB1, Wang C5
Author Information:
1Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine & Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, 800 Washington Street, Box 406, Boston, MA, 02111, USA.
2The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
3Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.
4Center for Treatment Comparison and Integrative Analysis, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
5Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine & Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, 800 Washington Street, Box 406, Boston, MA, 02111, USA. cwang2@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.
Conference/Journal: Clin Rheumatol.
Date published: 2019 Jan 14
Other: Special Notes: doi: 10.1007/s10067-019-04436-1. [Epub ahead of print] , Word Count: 291


OBJECTIVE: Previous studies suggest mindfulness is associated with pain and depression. However, its impact in individuals with fibromyalgia remains unclear. We examined associations between mindfulness and physical and psychological symptoms, pain interference, and quality of life in fibromyalgia patients.

METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis on baseline data from a fibromyalgia clinical trial. Mindfulness was assessed using the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). Pearson's correlations and multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between mindfulness and fibromyalgia impact, pain interference, physical function, depression, anxiety, stress, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life. We also examined whether mindfulness moderated associations between fibromyalgia impact and psychological outcomes.

RESULTS: A total of 177 participants (age 52.0 ± 12.2 (SD) years; 93.2% women; 58.8% white; body mass index 30.1 ± 6.7 kg/m2; FFMQ score 131.3 ± 20.7; Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire score 57.0 ± 19.4) were included. Higher total mindfulness was significantly associated with lower fibromyalgia impact (r = - 0.25), pain interference (r = - 0.31), stress (r = - 0.56), anxiety (r = - 0.58), depression (r = - 0.54), and better mental health-related quality of life (r = 0.57). Describing, Acting-with-awareness, and Non-judging facets of mindfulness were also associated with these outcomes. Mindfulness moderated the effect of fibromyalgia impact on anxiety (interaction P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION: Higher mindfulness is associated with less pain interference, lower impact of fibromyalgia, and better psychological health and quality of life in people with fibromyalgia. Mindfulness moderates the influence of fibromyalgia impact on anxiety, suggesting mindfulness may alter how patients cope with fibromyalgia. Future studies should assess how mind-body therapies aiming to cultivate mindfulness may impact the well-being of patients with fibromyalgia.

KEY POINTS: • Higher mindfulness was associated with better psychological health and lower overall impact of fibromyalgia. • Mindfulness moderated the relationship between overall fibromyalgia impact and anxiety.

KEYWORDS: Anxiety; Depression; Fibromyalgia; Mindfulness; Pain; Quality of life; Stress

PMID: 30644003 DOI: 10.1007/s10067-019-04436-1

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