Turo (qi dance) Program for Parkinson's Disease Patients: Randomized, Assessor Blind, Waiting-List Control, Partial Crossover Study.

Author: Lee HJ1, Kim SY2, Chae Y3, Kim MY4, Yin C3, Jung WS4, Cho KH4, Kim SN5, Park HJ6, Lee H3
Author Information:
1Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea; Sub Dept. of Qigong Therapy, College of Korean Medicine Hospital, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea; Dance and Traditional Korean Medicine Science Research Center, School of Dance, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea.
2Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea; College of Korean Medicine, Gachon University, Republic of Korea.
3Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea.
4Department of Cardiovascular & Neurologic Diseases (Stroke Center), College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 23 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea.
5Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea; College of Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, llsandonggu, Goyangsi, Gyeonggido 10326, Republic of Korea.
6Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: acufind@khu.ac.kr.
Conference/Journal: Explore (NY).
Date published: 2018 Mar 1
Other: Pages: S1550-8307(17)30196-9 , Special Notes: doi: 10.1016/j.explore.2017.11.002. [Epub ahead of print] , Word Count: 254


CONTEXT: Qigong, Tai-chi and dancing have all been proven effective for Parkinson's disease (PD); however, no study has yet assessed the efficacy of Turo, a hybrid qigong dancing program developed to relieve symptoms in PD patients.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Turo may provide benefit in addressing the symptoms of PD patients.

DESIGN: Randomized, assessor blind, waiting-list control, partial crossover study.

SETTING: Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 32 PD patients (mean age 65.7 ± 6.8).

INTERVENTION: Participants were assigned to the Turo group or the waiting-list control group. The Turo group participated in an 8-week Turo training program (60-minute sessions twice a week). The waiting-list control group received no additional treatment during the same period; then underwent the same 8-week Turo training.

OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was a score on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the secondary outcomes included the perceived health status assessed using the Parkinson's disease Quality of Life questionnaire (PDQL), balance function as assessed by the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the results of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI).

RESULTS: The Turo group showed statistically significant improvements in the UPDRS (P < 0.01) and PDQL (P < 0.05) as compared to the control group. The changes in BBS scores displayed a tendency toward improvement, but was not statistically significant (P = 0.051).

CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that Turo PD training might improve the symptoms of PD patients.

Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

KEYWORDS: Complementary and alternative medicine; Parkinson’s disease; Qigong; Turo; UPDRS

PMID: 29650371 DOI: 10.1016/j.explore.2017.11.002

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