Whole body and local muscle vibration immediately improves quadriceps function in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Author: Pamukoff DN, Pietrosimone B, Lewek MD, Ryan ED, Weinhold PS, Lee DR, Blackburn JT
Affiliation: 1Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Fullerton; Fullerton, CA, USA; Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: dpamukoff@fullerton.edu. 2Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA. 3Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Division of Physical Therapy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA. 4Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Department of Orthopedics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University; Chapel Hill and Raleigh, NC, USA. 5Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA. 6Department of Exercise and Sport Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Curriculum in Human Movement Science, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Department of Orthopedics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
Conference/Journal: Arch Phys Med Rehabil.
Date published: 2016 Feb 8
Other: Pages: S0003-9993(16)00088-5 , Special Notes: doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.01.021. [Epub ahead of print] , Word Count: 290


OBJECTIVE: To determine the immediate effects of a single session of whole body vibration (WBV) and local muscle vibration (LMV) on quadriceps function in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR).

STUDY DESIGN: Singe-blind randomized crossover trial.

SETTING: Research Laboratory.

PARTICPANTS: 20 population-based sample of individuals with ACLR (age=21.1 (1.2) years, mass=77.2 (17.1) kg, time since ACLR=50.7 (21.3) months; 14 females, 16 patellar tendon autograft, 3 hamstring autograft, 1 allograft).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Participants performed isometric squats while being exposed to WBV, LMV, or no vibration (control). Interventions were delivered in a randomized order during separate visits separated by 1-week. Quadriceps active motor threshold (AMT), motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, H-reflex amplitude, peak torque (PT), rate of torque development (RTD), Electromygraphy (EMG) amplitude, and central activation (CAR) ratio was assessed prior to and immediately following a WBV, LMV, or control intervention.

RESULTS: There was an increase in CAR (+4.9%, p=0.001), and EMG amplitude (+16.2%, p=0.002), and a reduction in AMT (-3.1%, p<0.001) following WBV, and an increase in CAR (+2.7%, p=0.001) and reduction in AMT (-2.9%, p<0.001) following LMV. No effect was observed following WBV or LMV in H-reflex, RTD, or MEP amplitude. AMT (-3.7%, p<0.001), CAR (+5.7%, p=0.005), PT (+0.31 Nm/kg, p=0.004) and EMG amplitude (p=0.002) in the WBV condition differed from the control condition post application. AMT (-3.0% p=0.002), CAR (+3.6% p=0.005), and PT (+0.30 Nm/kg, p=0.002) in the LMV condition differed from the control condition post application. No differences were observed between WBV and LMV post application in any measurement.

CONCLUSION: WBV and LMV acutely improved quadriceps function, and could be useful modalities for restoring quadriceps strength in individuals with knee pathologies.

Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Knee; Muscle; Osteoarthritis; Rehabilitation; StrengthPMID: 26869286 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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