Comparing the effects of whole-body vibration to standard exercise in ambulatory people with Multiple Sclerosis: A randomised controlled feasibility study.

Author: Uszynski MK1, Purtill H2, Donnelly A3, Coote S4.
Affiliation: 1Clinical Therapies Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland Multiple Sclerosis Society of Ireland, Galway, Ireland marcin.ucho@hotmail.com. 2Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. 3Physical Education & Sport Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. 4Clinical Therapies Department, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
Conference/Journal: Clin Rehabil.
Date published: 2015 Jul 27
Other: Word Count: 252



OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed firstly to investigate the feasibility of the study protocol and outcome measures, secondly to obtain data in order to inform the power calculations for a larger randomised controlled trial, and finally to investigate if whole-body vibration (WBV) is more effective than the same duration and intensity of standard exercises (EXE) in people with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS).
DESIGN:
Randomised controlled feasibility study.
SETTING:
Outpatient MS centre.
SUBJECTS:
Twenty seven PwMS (age mean (SD) 48.1 (11.2)) with minimal gait impairments.
INTERVENTIONS:
Twelve weeks of WBV or standard EXE, three times weekly.
MAIN MEASURES:
Participants were measured with isokinetic muscle strength, vibration threshold, Timed Up and Go test (TUG), Mini-BESTest (MBT), 6 Minute Walk test (6MWT), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale 29 (MSIS 29), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and Verbal Analogue scale for sensation (VAS) pre and post 12 week intervention.
RESULTS:
WBV intervention was found feasible with low drop-out rate (11.1%) and high compliance (90%). Data suggest that a sample of 52 in each group would be sufficient to detect a moderate effect size, with 80% power and 5% significance for 6 minute walk test. Large effect sizes in favour of standard exercise were found for vibration threshold at 5th metatarsophalangeal joint and heel (P=0.014, r= 0.5 and P=0.005, r=0.56 respectively). No between group differences were found for muscle strength, balance or gait (P>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS:
Data suggest that the protocol is feasible, there were no adverse effects. A trial including 120 people would be needed to detect an effect on walking endurance.
© The Author(s) 2015.
KEYWORDS:
Multiple Sclerosis; exercise; mobility; whole-body vibration
PMID: 26219667

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